Welcome to the WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM homepage.


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SYLLABUS





COMMON CORE STANDARDS IN WRITING AND LITERACY:




English/Language Arts Grades 9-12: Pages 45-47

History/Social Science/Science/Technology Grades 9-12: Pages 63-66


BASIC GUIDELINES FOR STANDARDS IN WRITING: (See the actual C.C. Standards PDF for the specific writing standards in your area.)

I. Types and Purposes of Writing: Students should be able to recognize each mode in what they read and use each mode when appropriate.

(Note that much good writing blends these various modes. They are not to be considered as "separate" kinds of essays.)

A. Informative/explanatory: Examines and conveys complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
B. Argumentative: Supports claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
C. Narrative: Develops real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured sequences of events.

II. Range and Extent of Writing: Students should write routinely for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.


A. Short time frames and products (a single sitting or 1-2 days) used often
B. Extended time frames (several days to several weeks) used less frequently for more complex assignments

II. Production and Distribution of Writing: Students should be able to complete various writing assignments from start to finish within reasonable time limits.


A. Determine how the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience; execute the writing assignment accordingly.
B. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
C. Use technology to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

III. Research as Tool for Building and Presenting Knowledge: Students should develop skills in using the internet, Google sites and docs, Wikispaces, and/or other web platforms.


A. Conduct short and lengthy research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating an understanding of the subject.
B. Gather relevant information from multiple sources, evaluate the reliability of sources, and integrate information from various sources, avoiding plagiarism.
C. Draw evidence from texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.



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TEXT: Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum, by Art Young


http://wac.colostate.edu/books/young_teaching/

Please read Ch. 1-2 for Wed, 6/19: Writing to Learn

Read Ch. 3 for Wed, 6/26: Communicating Across the Curriculum

Read Ch. 4 for Wed, 7/3: Writing to Communicate



Supplemental reading for Ch. 2: New York Times essay, "Visible Men"

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/16/books/review/creative-writing-in-a-massachusetts-prison.html?ref=books&_r=0

Supplemental reading for Ch. 4: "Making It Matter Through the Power of Inquiry," Wilhelm & Smith (handout)
PLEASE READ FOR MONDAY, JULY 8.




WEEK 1: WRITING FROM READING - JOURNAL WRITING & ARTICLE RESPONSES


Targeted Skills: Main Idea, Summary, Supporting Details


Tools for Short Writing and Idea Generation

Access the Templates at our Online Literacy Center here:


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http://bghs.d214.org/academics1/on_line_literacy_center.aspx



Short Daily Writing
3 x 3
Letters to the Living, Dead, or Inanimate
Note Webs
Double-Sided or Double-Entry Journals
Cornell Note-Taking System
Basic Article Response Template
Text Connections Template
Question Stems Template
Student of the World Template



ARTICLES FOR PRACTICE:


http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2013/06/05/why-your-doctor-is-afraid-of-your-dna.html

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2013/05/22/why-suicide-has-become-and-epidemic-and-what-we-can-do-to-help.html

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2013/05/29/the-many-cases-for-getting-married-young.html

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RUBRICS and RESPONSE FORMS FOR WEEK 1


To create a purposeful rubric, be sure to consider the following:


1. What skills are being assessed? They should match the skills that were taught and modeled.

2. Will the assignment be worth points or just be given a completion grade?

3. Will you fill out the rubric/response, or will other students, or will the writer? or some combination?


TYPES OF ASSESSMENTS


1. Traditional Grid Rubrics

2. Point Breakdown Rubrics

3. Scales or Continuums

4. Open-ended Comments/Reflections (self, peer, teacher)

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WEEK 2: WRITING TO COMMUNICATE SESSION 1 -- ANALYTICAL WRITING


Keep in mind when devising any writing activity: What is the PURPOSE? What is the POINT? Who is the AUDIENCE? What are the SKILLS?


Think of a unit/lesson/writing activity(ies) for your students that would incorporate one or more of the following patterns of thought.

Consider the process step by step, from pre-writing/organizing to drafting to editing to assessing.


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5 Ways We Explore What Things Are:

A. Describe or Illustrate

B. Define

C. Classify

D. Determine the Whole and its Parts

E. Compare and Contrast


3 Ways We Explore How Things Work or in What Order:

F. Sequence of Events (Narrative)

G. Process Analysis ("How-To")

H. Cause-Effect




Cruise ship
http://hutchinson-page.wikispaces.com/Photo+5

Don Draper

Stereotypes

Symphony
http://www.english-online.at/music/orchestra/orchestra.htm

Graphic organizer website
http://www.graphic.org/goindex.html

The Eagle Tutorial

Accidents
http://kidshealth.org/teen/safety/driving/post_crash.html#

Storm scenes



WEEK 3: THE BIG ONES -- ARGUMENTATION & RESEARCHED WRITING


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Communicating with the Class: Text-based arguments

Communicating with the World: Student-selected arguments



Definition of ARGUMENT: the use of evidence and reason to discover some version of the truth


Types of Argument:

- to explore

- to inform

- to make decisions

- to meditate or pray

- to persuade

- to convince


Arguments about the Past: Forensic Arguments (What happened?)

Arguments about the Present: Ceremonial Arguments (Where are we now?)

Arguments about the Future: Deliberative Arguments (What should happen?)



We use all the other types of writing -- writing to learn, writing to discover, and writing to analyze -- in the service of an argument.



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Toulmin Debate Model

SITES FOR EXPLORING PROVOCATIVE TOPICS:


New York Times "Room for Debate" column:

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate

Dist. 214 Library Resources site, Opposing Viewpoints (password: research214):

http://www.d214.org/district_library/214_library_resources_copy.aspx

TED Talks:

http://www.ted.com/talks

Sir Ken Robinson's definition of CREATIVITY: the process of having original ideas that have value

Robinson also reminds us that INTELLIGENCE is fluid, dynamic, and interactive.



HANDOUTS FOR WEEK 3












WEEK 4: CREATIVE WRITING - TO LEARN, EXPLORE, AND COMMUNICATE

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Why use creative writing?

- to see something in a new way or in a different context, hopefully to understand it better

- to provide a verbal vehicle of expression to ideas originally learned otherwise

- to make metaphoric or analogous connections, expanding understanding of the subject

- to have fun or be silly... or find humor in an otherwise non-humorous topic


CREATIVE WRITING FORMATS:

1. Descriptive writing (appealing to the 5 senses)

2. Narrative writing (story telling)

3. Drama (dialogue or scenes)

4. Poetry and Metaphoric Writing

5. Songwriting and Rap

6. Collage or Hybrid text (mixture of any of the above, often with visuals)

7. Video, imovie



CREATIVE WRITING ASSESSMENTS:

How picky should we be on a "creative" work? Let the rubric clarify this.

Consider focusing on just a few elements of content, isolating key skills and effort.

You might give points for using a particular number of elements, for length, for color/formatting,

or for memorization if it involves performance.

Other examples:

- Use of specific details that appeal to the 5 senses

- Use of figurative language

- Use of rhyme

- Ties to subject that are clever and original

- Clear narrative trajectory

- Consistent use of voice/point of view




Mining YouTube for Models:poetry-man.jpg



Schoolhouse Rock: Verbs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=US8mGU1MzYw&list=PLC8B9E347A97DBF59

England's Drama 4 Learning Initiative

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0uDH5rYX3E

Kids' Crazy Math Skit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vT83qy1VTDo